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ENVR Seminar: Doug Adams

What else can materials do?

Engineering mechano-optical multifunctional materials that sense, communicate, and actuate

 

Doug Adams
Daniel F. Flowers Professor and Distinguished Professor and Chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt University and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

 

Abstract
Materials are the building blocks of engineered systems. From infrastructure to implants, materials are used by humanity in myriad ways to transfer mechanical loads. This research explores other potential ways in which engineering materials might interact with their environment in useful ways. By incorporating micro- and nano-scale particles in 3D printer filament using a solution based process, multi-functional materials are realized. The optical properties of these printed materials are engineered to enable several new functionalities.

For example, gold nanoparticles in a thermoplastic matrix are used to create materials in which subsurface defects can be detected solely through the measurement of the material’s optical properties (absorbance). Optically responsive materials can be printed with phosphor additives, which enable the printed material to luminesce when excited by an alternating electrical current thereby enabling structural health monitoring and visually interactive structural systems in applications including nuclear power plants.

 

Biography
Adams is the Daniel F. Flowers Professor and Distinguished Professor and Chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt University and Professor of Mechanical Engineering. His research in nonlinear system identification identifies unique signatures that illuminate how materials and machines degrade in order to develop intelligent infrastructure in energy, security, and manufacturing applications. He has conducted over 140 sponsored programs, written 260 technical papers, been awarded 9 patents, and authored a textbook on structural health monitoring as well as several book chapters, including chapters on damage prognosis of aerospace structures, structural health monitoring of wind turbines, and structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure. Research awards he has received include the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, Society of Experimental Mechanics DeMichele and Lazan Awards, Structural Health Monitoring Person of the Year Award, and he was elected a Fellow of ASME in 2011. He has supervised 58 MS and PhD students and 57 undergraduate research assistants. 

Thursday, April 25 at 3:40pm to 5:00pm

John D. Tickle Engineering Building, 405
851 Neyland Dr, Knoxville, TN 37996

Event Type

Lectures & Presentations

Topic

Engineering

Audience

Current Students, Faculty & Staff, General Public

Tags

CEE Seminar, CEE Spring 2019

Department

Civil and Environmental Engineering

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